Contents
  1. Peter Bergen
  2. Manhunt: From 9/11 to Abbottabad – the 10-year Search for Osama bin Laden by Peter Bergen: review
  3. The 'Manhunt' To Capture Osama Bin Laden
  4. Peter Bergen: The 'Manhunt' To Capture Osama Bin Laden : NPR

NOW AN HBO DOCUMENTARY In Manhunt, Peter Bergen delivers a taut yet panoramic account of the pursuit and killing of Osama bin. Editorial Reviews. Review. Chosen by the Washington Post As One of the Best Nonfiction "In Manhunt, Peter Bergen has produced a page-turner rich with new information and insight into the search for Bin Laden and his killing. Only Bergen. contact, counter-radicalization, emergency preparedness and resilience appears to be an effective approach to minimizing lone wolf terrorism and its impact'' (p.

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Manhunt Peter Bergen Pdf

Peter Bergen. CNN National Security Analyst and Best-Selling Author of Manhunt . Award-winning journalist and producer Peter Bergen is one of the nation's. In Manhunt, Peter Bergen delivers a taut yet panoramic account of the pursuit and killing of Osama bin Laden. Here are riveting new details of bin Laden's flight . Read Manhunt PDF - The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad by Peter L. Bergen Broadway Books | NOW AN HBO.

Instead, U. At first, they tracked the Kuwaiti courier and his brother as they came and left the compound. They also kept track of the compound's clotheslines — as a way to determine the gender makeup and how many people were living in the complex. Other people thought this could be a criminal just trying to keep a low profile There were a range of possibilities. To strengthen their case, the agency compiled a team of intelligence agents who hadn't worked on the bin Laden case. They were asked to look at all of the incoming evidence from the Abbottabad compound — and make a case that bin Laden didn't live there. This was when President Obama was having his national security meetings about this, and generally when you want to make a decision like this, your level of certitude you want to go up, not down. But not everyone at the meeting was in favor. Defense Secretary Robert Gates favored a drone strike operation, to avoid a potential rescue mission, while Vice President Joe Biden advocated a "wait-and-see" approach, fearing that a strike would hurt Pakistani-U. The mission was approved. They weren't on the ground for long. After killing bin Laden, they gathered thousands of documents from the compound and took bin Laden's body back onto the helicopter.

Peter Bergen

There was no air-conditioning. Such details are important in part because they remind us that Bin Laden, for all the monstrosity of his views and acts, was human. There have been times in the past decade when the Saudi-born son of a construction tycoon and veteran of the Afghan war has appeared more myth than man.

Bergen neatly skewers hyperventilating analysts who spoke of world war three or four, reminding us that Bin Laden, al-Qaida and contemporary Sunni militancy were never an existential danger to our societies and values in the way that previous threats have been.

There are some nuggets of new information including a fascinating description of how rampant sexism within the CIA in the late s stymied some analysts' efforts to attract attention to the growing danger posed by al-Qaida, and of later attempts to identify a bird heard chirping on one video recording issued by Bin Laden.

A German ornithologist was called in by the agency to try to identify its species and thus, perhaps, location. Bergen rightly points out how, by the end of the last decade, al-Qaida's brand had been badly tarnished and quotes documents captured in the Abbottabad raid that show how Bin Laden, increasingly out of touch with ground realities, even reflected on a new name for the organisation as part of a major relaunch.

After about a hundred pages, though already rattling along nicely, the narrative moves up a gear. Bergen describes how analysts assembled and matched a huge amount of information from multiple detainee interviews, from thousands of al-Qaida documents recovered on the battlefield or following arrests, and from open-source reporting.

Manhunt: From 9/11 to Abbottabad – the 10-year Search for Osama bin Laden by Peter Bergen: review

Importantly, instead of mapping hierarchies, the hunters sought to build up a picture of horizontal connections. This new approach — part of a more general paradigm shift in terms of how militancy was understood — was critical. Focusing on connections and links, rather than apparent ranks, meant different people were highlighted.

These might be lowly in status — such as a driver — but high in significance within an organisation. Indeed, the specific focus on the courier network is what finally provided the breakthrough in the case after years and years of searching. However, even after locating the compound where CIA analysts suspected bin Laden was hiding, we learn of the immense struggle among those analysts as they sought to prove to their superiors that bin Laden was actually there.

Ultimately, the heavy burden of deciding whether to attack the compound, and how, fell to President Barack Obama. Yet despite that uncertainty, despite the advice of seasoned policy makers like Vice President Joe Biden and Defense Secretary Robert Gates telling him not to go, and despite the very real chance that the raid would greatly strain relations with Pakistan, Obama gave the green light.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Bergen, About the Bin Laden Killing".

The 'Manhunt' To Capture Osama Bin Laden

The New York Times. Last year, Bergen traveled to bin Laden's compound, which sits just a mile or so away from a Pakistani military academy. Surrounded by high walls and barbed wire, it once contained 24 people — bin Laden, his wives, their children, some grandchildren and his courier's family.

They lived in close quarters and rarely left the confines of the compound itself, says Bergen. They were not at all living in any kind of luxury, but on the other hand, [they were] not uncomfortable," he tells Fresh Air 's Dave Davies.

When bin Laden did leave the compound, he took walks through his vegetable garden, which was partially covered by a roof. That's one of the reasons that there was never proof positive that he was there. Instead, U. At first, they tracked the Kuwaiti courier and his brother as they came and left the compound. They also kept track of the compound's clotheslines — as a way to determine the gender makeup and how many people were living in the complex.

Peter Bergen: The 'Manhunt' To Capture Osama Bin Laden : NPR

Other people thought this could be a criminal just trying to keep a low profile There were a range of possibilities. Proving that bin Laden lived in the compound fell to the CIA. To strengthen their case, the agency compiled a team of intelligence agents who hadn't worked on the bin Laden case. They were asked to look at all of the incoming evidence from the Abbottabad compound — and make a case that bin Laden didn't live there.

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